FAQs

FAQs



Q:  What is an ICF/IID?

A:  ICF/IID’s provide active treatment, ongoing evaluation, planning, 24-hour supervision, coordination, and integration of health or rehabilitative services for the mentally retarded or persons with related conditions.  These services occur in a protected residential setting in order to help each individual function at his/her greatest ability.  Day program activities are provided by ICF/IIDs on or offsite.

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Q:  What is Active Treatment?

A:  Active treatment is a major component of an ICF/IID program.  It means aggressive, consistent implementation of a program of specialized and generic training, treatment, and health services.  Active treatment does not include services to maintain generally independent clients who are able to function with little supervision or in the absence of a continuous active treatment program.  ICF/IIDs also provide daily free-time to participants.

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Q:  How are Service Needs Determined in an ICF/IID?

A:  An interdisciplinary team determines each individual resident’s needs.  The team is a group of professionals, paraprofessionals and non-professionals who possess the knowledge, skill, and expertise necessary to accurately identify the comprehensive array of the individual's needs and design appropriate services and specialized programs responsive to those needs.  Specialists include physicians, psychologists, dieticians, pharmacists, social workers, nurses, and others.  The team ensures that the ICF/IID that meets the needs of your loved one.

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Q:  How Many Individuals Reside in Each Type of ICF/IID?

A:  ICF/IIDs range in size from 6 to 120 beds.  There are four types of ICF/IIDs: 

  1. The most common type are 6 bed facilities which are similar to group homes.
  2. Cluster facilities have 8-bed units and private rooms.
  3. 64-bed facilities have four separate units with 16 beds each and they specialize in medical care.
  4. Other ICF/IIDs are variations of the prior three facilities ranging in size from 12-110 beds and often featuring a campus environment.

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Q:  What are the Eligibility Criteria for ICF/IID Placement?

A:  An individual must be diagnosed as developmentally disabled (having a disorder or syndrome attributable to retardation, cerebral palsy, autism, spina bifida, or Prader-Willi syndrome) and in need of 24 hour supervision, coordination, and integration of health or rehabilitative services.

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Q:  How is the Cost of Care in an ICF/IID Funded?

A:  The vast majority of individuals residing in ICF/IIDs are funded through the Florida Medicaid program along with personal contributions based on income.

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Q:  How are ICF/IIDs Regulated?

A:  ICF/IIDs are regulated under chapters 400 and 408 Florida Statutes.  Each ICF/IID facility is licensed by AHCA and each client's active treatment program must be integrated, coordinated and monitored by a qualified mental retardation professional.

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